"If you don’t know history, then you don’t know anything. You are a leaf that doesn’t know it is part of a tree"

— Michael Crichton

My thesis is done. #thesis #trafalgar #done #college (Taken with Instagram at Arnold Bernhard Library)

My thesis is done. #thesis #trafalgar #done #college (Taken with Instagram at Arnold Bernhard Library)

One of the many reasons you don’t want to write a thesis (Taken with Instagram at Arnold Bernhard Library)

One of the many reasons you don’t want to write a thesis (Taken with Instagram at Arnold Bernhard Library)

"As fresh data appear, mistakes will be found and later writers will make new interpretations. It is the fate of all historians, especially those who take the risk of writing shortly after the event, to be superseded, Far safer to write about an era long past, in which all the actors are long since dead!"

— Samuel Elliot Morison

historical-nonfiction:

That stiff man with the stork is actually one of the most revered British generals from WWI. He was so good he got a Viscountcy. Edmund Allenby, 1st Viscount Allenby, first experienced combat in the Boer War. There, he became completely contemptous of the established command system. This contempt got him banished during WWI to the Middle East. Ironically, this was the making of his career. Allenby quickly gained the respect of the troops of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force by moving his HQ to a position closer to the front and visiting the troops regularly in the frontlines. He reorganized the EEF into an effective Corps system and imposing discipline and professionalism on the whole command.  He also gave financial support to T.E. Lawrence’s efforts to unite the Arabs in revolt against their Ottoman overlords. It is even believed that one of his victories was a prelude to the Blitzkrieg that would prove so effective in WWII. All in all, a pretty cool guy.

historical-nonfiction:

That stiff man with the stork is actually one of the most revered British generals from WWI. He was so good he got a Viscountcy. Edmund Allenby, 1st Viscount Allenby, first experienced combat in the Boer War. There, he became completely contemptous of the established command system. This contempt got him banished during WWI to the Middle East. Ironically, this was the making of his career. Allenby quickly gained the respect of the troops of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force by moving his HQ to a position closer to the front and visiting the troops regularly in the frontlines. He reorganized the EEF into an effective Corps system and imposing discipline and professionalism on the whole command.  He also gave financial support to T.E. Lawrence’s efforts to unite the Arabs in revolt against their Ottoman overlords. It is even believed that one of his victories was a prelude to the Blitzkrieg that would prove so effective in WWII. All in all, a pretty cool guy.

historical-nonfiction:

There was a British Vice-Admiral, Lord Horatio Nelson, who had been blinded in one of his eyes early in his naval career.  This was during the Napoleonic Wars (1802-1815) and the only thing keeping Britain from being taken by the French was their navy, at the time the best in the world. However, they always had problems filling the ranks (leading to things like impressment) so even half-blind Lord Nelson was welcome. It didn’t hurt that Nelson was a noble, too. During one battle, his commander raised a flag from another ship, giving him permission to withdraw. Nelson lifted his telescope to his blind eye, stated truthfully that he did not see a signal, and so they should continue fighting.   He went on to win the battle. And the phrase, “turn a blind eye” became an idiom.

I may or may not write my thesis on this guy, that’d be a cool story to tell.

historical-nonfiction:

There was a British Vice-Admiral, Lord Horatio Nelson, who had been blinded in one of his eyes early in his naval career.  This was during the Napoleonic Wars (1802-1815) and the only thing keeping Britain from being taken by the French was their navy, at the time the best in the world. However, they always had problems filling the ranks (leading to things like impressment) so even half-blind Lord Nelson was welcome. It didn’t hurt that Nelson was a noble, too. During one battle, his commander raised a flag from another ship, giving him permission to withdraw. Nelson lifted his telescope to his blind eye, stated truthfully that he did not see a signal, and so they should continue fighting.   He went on to win the battle. And the phrase, “turn a blind eye” became an idiom.

I may or may not write my thesis on this guy, that’d be a cool story to tell.

(Source: )

ourpresidents:

“And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you- ask what you can do for your country.”

-John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address

On January 20, 1961, John Fitzgerald Kennedy was sworn in as the 35th President of the United States. 

From the JFK Library - Inauguration

Important Things That Happened on Christmas

historical-nonfiction:

  • Charlemagne was crowned the Holy Roman Emperor in 800 AD
  • Kingdom of Hungary was formed as a Christian kingdom in 1000 AD with the coronation of Stephen I by Pope Sylvester II
  • William the Conqueror was crowned in 1066
  • Finally, a non-coronation: Sir Isaac Newton, creator of modern physics and calculus, was born in 1642
  • Haley’s Comet was confirmed in 1758
  • First game of ice hockey in 1855
  • Gorbachev resigned in 1991

(Source: toptenz.net)

todaysdocument:

Treaty of Ghent

This treaty, signed on December 24, 1814, ended the War of 1812, fought between Great Britain and the United States. However, news of the treaty spread slowly, and word of peace did not reach the American and British armies for some time. American forces, led by Andrew Jackson, won the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815, ending the hostilities after the official peace.
 

todaysdocument:

From November 28 to December 1, 1943, the “Big Three”—Franklin D.  Roosevelt, Joseph Stalin, and Winston Churchill—met at Teheran, Iran to  discuss the progress of the war and plans for what would become the D-day invasion of June 6, 1944.
Read FDR’s Fireside Chat on Teheran and Cairo Conferences and visit the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

todaysdocument:

From November 28 to December 1, 1943, the “Big Three”—Franklin D. Roosevelt, Joseph Stalin, and Winston Churchill—met at Teheran, Iran to discuss the progress of the war and plans for what would become the D-day invasion of June 6, 1944.

Read FDR’s Fireside Chat on Teheran and Cairo Conferences and visit the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum


historical-nonfiction:

Map of the world by a Christian knight, 1596

historical-nonfiction:

Map of the world by a Christian knight, 1596

gunhilde:

penannular brooch, Dymes, Eigersund, Rogaland, 10th C.Historisk Museum, Oslo

Looks like the Hand of the Kings pin

gunhilde:

penannular brooch, Dymes, Eigersund, Rogaland, 10th C.
Historisk Museum, Oslo

Looks like the Hand of the Kings pin

littlefooted:

so rad.

youknowyoureahistoryfanwhen:

submitted by thegoodguyalwayswins
greatestgeneration:

JFK swagger
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